D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago
       
     
D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E. J. Ingram House
       
     
Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Pullman Colonnade Apartments
       
     
Residences in Pullman
       
     
Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church
       
     
Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church
       
     
DuSable Museum Roundhouse
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Welcome Inn Manor Bed & Breakfast
       
     
Welcome Inn Manor B&B
       
     
Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel
       
     
Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel
       
     
First Church of Deliverance
       
     
First Church of Deliverance
       
     
First Church of Deliverance
       
     
Lavezzorio Community Center
       
     
Lavezzorio Community Center
       
     
Alpha Kappa Alpha HQ
       
     
D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago
       
     
D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago

Located 1121 E. 60th Street on the southern edge of the University of Chicago campus, this building was designed by Eero Saarinen and completed in 1959.

D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago
       
     
D'Angelo Law Library, University of Chicago

This alternate view--not included in the exhibit--provides a side view of the building's accordion-like curtain wall while showcasing the complex's lines and proportions.

Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House

Designed by architect Roger Margerum, an African American, this modernist gem at 6500 S. Eberhart stands out in a neighborhood of predominantly late 19th century and early 20th century homes and apartment buildings. It was designed for black physician E.J. Ingram and completed in 1959.

Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House

Living room space with paneled room divider.

Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House

Not seen in the show, this view features a still-functioning original intercom system located in the home's living room.

Dr. E.J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E.J. Ingram House

Not included in the show, this view shows the home's equally modernist garage.

Dr. E. J. Ingram House
       
     
Dr. E. J. Ingram House

A view not included in the show: This angle shows the relationship between the garage and the rear of the home.

Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners

This still-functioning dry cleaners, 558 E. 79th, is the work of architect Gerald Siegwart, a modernist who also designed some midcentury homes in the surrounding Chatham neighborhood. Built in 1959, the building has a soaring hyperbolic paraboloid concrete roof that points skyward. The self-supporting roof requires no interior columns, freeing up floor space for more efficient business operations. The boarded-up window, however, is shameful.

Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners

This view--not featured in the show--features Pride Cleaners' colorful, marquee-like sign.

Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners

This view--not seen in the show--features the cleaner's glassy east elevation with its original colors and signage. At this writing, the building is for sale. Perhaps new owners can give this building the restoration it needs and deserves.

Pride Cleaners
       
     
Pride Cleaners

Another alternate view not in the show, this image shows the roof, sign and curtain wall.

Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School

This mammoth Art Deco/Art Moderne building, 2100 E. 87th, is credited to Chicago Public Schools chief architect John C. Christensen. It is the city's second largest high school in terms of size--only Lane Tech on the North Side is bigger--and a recent restoration allows its WPA/Machine Age aesthetic and detailing to shine again. One note: the building's crests indicate the structure was completed in 1938; in reality, it wasn't finished until 1941 due to construction delays.

Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School

The school's beautifully monumental gymnasium entrance, located on the eastern end of the building's 87th Street main wing. It matches the auditorium entrance on the wing's western end.

Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School

This angle shows one of the former shop wings--it looks like a mini-factory--on the school's eastern end. The wall-like structure in the background is a retaining wall for the Chicago Skyway, an elevated tollway to Indiana. 

Chicago Vocational High School
       
     
Chicago Vocational High School

This view--not featured in the exhibit--showcases the rather lush and well-maintained grounds in front of the school's main wing on 87th Street.

Pullman Colonnade Apartments
       
     
Pullman Colonnade Apartments

Located in the heart of the Pullman neighborhood--railroad car manufacturer George Pullman's famed 19th century town--the site features four curved two-story colonnaded apartment buildings surrounding a public square. The former Pullman Market Hall, where produce and bread were sold in George Pullman's time, sits in the square's center. The apartments were designed by Pullman town architect Solon S. Beman and were created to serve patrons of the 1893 World's Fair, just seven miles north.

Residences in Pullman
       
     
Residences in Pullman

This duplex, 612-614 E. 112th Street, is a fine-looking work by Pullman town architect Solon Beman. Built in 1893, it neighbors the Pullman Colonnade Apartments--it's one of four similar duplexes, each paired with a Colonnade building--and shares design details such as those limestone arches.

Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church
       
     
Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church

Located at 11211 S St. Lawrence Avenue, this 1882 church is one of the few buildings in Pullman that isn't made of red brick. Pullman architect Solon Beman designed this beauty and used green serpentine limestone quarried in Pennsylvania. 

Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church
       
     
Pullman's Greenstone United Methodist Church

Not seen in the exhibit, this view shows the interior of the still-functioning church as the late afternoon sun shines in.

DuSable Museum Roundhouse
       
     
DuSable Museum Roundhouse

Built in 1881 and designed by Burnham & Root, this former stables complex features one of the best hidden spaces in the city: a grand, windowed rotunda--itself a fine essay in brick, wood and glass--topped by a band of clerestory windows. The building, 5700 S. Cottage Grove Avenue, is operated by the neighboring DuSable Museum of African American History. The museum restored the exterior (and this rotunda) a few years ago and plans a second phase that includes expansion into the space.

Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments

Occupying a square city block bounded by 46th and 47th streets and Michigan and Wabash avenues, the Rosenwald Apartments were built in 1929 and designed by architect Ernest Grunsfeld Jr. The complex was funded by Sears president Julius Rosenwald to provide affordable, quality housing for the then-growing Bronzeville community. The building turns a handsome brick Art Deco face to the world, while giving residents a series of generous interior courtyard spaces that were vibrantly landscaped with trees and flowers during the building's early years. Luminaries such as music producer Quincy Jones, Nat "King" Cole and writer Gwendolyn Brooks lived here in their own early years. The building recently rebounded from decades of vacancy and near-ruinous decay, thanks to a $132 million rehab completed in 2016. Today, the building is a mix of market rate and subsidized housing.

Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments

Another view of a section of the Rosenwald, as seen from its interior courtyard.

Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments

A renovated lobby space inside the Rosenwald apartments.

Rosenwald Apartments
       
     
Rosenwald Apartments

A view not seen in the show, this image shows the size of the outdoor spaces within the Rosenwald.

Welcome Inn Manor Bed & Breakfast
       
     
Welcome Inn Manor Bed & Breakfast

Built in 1893, the generous brick and limestone home and the nearby buildings are surviving examples of the Grand Boulevard neighborhood's upscale origins. In recent years, the African American neighborhood has been working hard to shake off the negative effects of decades of profoundly racist city policies, and equally anti-black economic red-lining by banks, insurance companies and the retail industry. One result of this resistance is one of the city's best B&Bs--a black-owned business that operates in this landmark-quality home.

Welcome Inn Manor B&B
       
     
Welcome Inn Manor B&B

Owners Mell and Angela Monroe relax in a den in their B&B. Note the photos behind them.

Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel
       
     
Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel

This building, 65 E. 32nd St., on the Illinois Institute of Technology campus, is the only religious structure designed by architect Ludwig Mies van der Rohe. Built in 1951, the single-room structure has been nicknamed the "God Box" for its simplicity and lack of religious adornment--except for a stainless steel cross inside. The building received a million-dollar restoration in 2014.

Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel
       
     
Robert F. Carr Memorial Chapel

This view--not seen in the show--puts the spotlight on the chapel's big glass front.

First Church of Deliverance
       
     
First Church of Deliverance

Walter T. Bailey, the first black person to receive an Illinois architecture license, turned a dowdy former hat factory into this Art Moderne stunner at 4315 S. Wabash.

Completed in 1939 (the towers were added in 1946), it was a modern design for a modern church. First Church had a national radio broadcast beginning in 1934 that gave its pastor, the Rev. Clarence Cobbs and his 200-member choir, coast-to-coast reach and influence. The congregation's choir revolutionized the sound of gospel music in 1939 when its organist and composer Kenneth Morris convinced Cobbs to install the newly-created Hammond electric organ at the church.  Songs that later became gospel standards made their debut at the church under Hobbs, including the staple, How I Got Over."

Bailey's partner in converting the old hat factory into a church was Charles Sumner Duke, the state's first licensed black structural engineer. Duke is responsible for the engineering of Chicago's Michigan Avenue Bridge over the Chicago River.

First Church of Deliverance
       
     
First Church of Deliverance

The church's sanctuary, featuring a lighted cross suspended from the ceiling.

 

First Church of Deliverance
       
     
First Church of Deliverance

This view, not seen in the show, features stage-side seating, the Art Moderne detailing that marks the choir loft, and a religious mural featuring black figures.

Lavezzorio Community Center
       
     
Lavezzorio Community Center

Completed in 2008 and located at 7600 S. Parnell, this community center is one of the lesser-known works of celebrated Chicago architect Jeanne Gang. With a bare-bones budget and donated materials, Gang and her Studio/Gang firm turned out a fine little building--with a layered concrete exterior and that unconventional corner window--that respects the community in which it is located.

Lavezzorio Community Center
       
     
Lavezzorio Community Center

This view--not featured in the show--gives attention to the layered concrete facade that looks almost weightless above the ground-level windows.

Alpha Kappa Alpha HQ
       
     
Alpha Kappa Alpha HQ

This headquarters for the predominantly black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha, was designed by black architect John Moutoussamy. Located at 57th and Stony Island, the building was largely overlooked when it opened in 1983, in part because it's a decidedly modernist building created after modernism fell from favor. Looking at it now, Moutoussamy made the correct choice. The building's clear, rational and glassy geometric face gives it a timelessness that likely would've been lost by now had he gone with a then-fashionable Postmodern design. Moutoussamy is best known as designer of the former Ebony/Jet Building, 820 S. Michigan Avenue.